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Posts Tagged ‘Star Trek’

Star Trek Log Six by Alan Dean Foster

Posted by Tracy Poff on September 27, 2017

In February 1976 was published Star Trek Log Six, another entry in Alan Dean Foster’s series of adaptations of Star Trek: The Animated Series.

This would be the last book in the series to adapt three episodes; the remaining four episodes would be expanded to fill an entire book each. I anticipate that those books will be more interesting, but time will tell. For now, let’s look at the three stories in this book: “Albatross”, “The Practical Joker”, and “How Sharper Than a Serpent’s Tooth”.

Albatross

On a routine diplomatic mission, Dr. McCoy is unexpectedly arrested. The charge: genocide. He is accused of causing a plague on Dramia II, either through incompetence or malice. His shipmates must try to find proof of his innocence before it’s too late.

This is an entertaining enough read, but it’s got a few flaws. The biggest is this: Spock arranges for the ship to self-destruct in order to prevent the spread of the plague, and then beams down to Draymia to effect a jail-break. The plague is almost invariably fatal, appears to kill within hours of infection, and has not been cured in decades of research, but he is prepared to gamble that Dr. McCoy will be able to manage a cure in the few hours before the entire planet’s population is killed? When McCoy calls attention to this, Spock replies that he “felt justified in taking a calculated risk.” Inconceivable! Besides that, every doctor that ever worked on curing the plague must have been carrying the idiot ball, since they somehow failed to discover the its cause, which McCoy managed by simply asking the computer what could have caused most of its symptoms.

The Practical Joker

The ship’s computer gets ‘sick’ from passing through a weird energy field, and starts playing increasingly dangerous practical jokes on the crew. Meanwhile, some Romulans intend to capture the Enterprise.

The most interesting parts of this dull story are the unimportant bits thrown in to give it some color.

As an aside, my copy of this book also has an astounding misprint–an entire line printed on the wrong page. The quality of editing in these books is pretty bad, to begin with, but this is a new low.

How Sharper Than a Serpent’s Tooth

Kukulkan, a winged snake, kidnaps Kirk, McCoy, Scotty, and Ensign Walking Bear, and intends to destroy them–and the remainder of the Enterprise crew–if they cannot satisfy him. He is revealed to have visited Earth many years ago, giving Mayans their famous calendar, and similarly influencing other cultures. He wishes for humans to worship him, and in return he will guide them, but it is not to be. As Kirk says, “you cannot have intelligent slaves”. They will not stand for it.

A mediocre story. Essentially not so different from “Who Mourns for Adonais?”, which revealed that the Greek gods were aliens, and a similar concept was on display in “The Magicks of Megas-tu”. This story doesn’t really do anything with the premise, though; Kukulkan is just a generic threat to the Enterprise, and he gets perhaps a page of characterization before the story ends. Kirk and the others get a chance to show–again very briefly–that humanity has moved beyond its savage past, but little is made of it. If Kukulkan really was instrumental in shaping the fate of humanity, why didn’t that get some focus? Disappointing.

In summary

All the stories are competently done, but they don’t offer anything substantial to keep the reader’s attention–no new insights or interestingly different takes on the episodes. It makes me long for the previous book: “The Ambergris Element” opened with a look at M’ress as she decided to enter Starfleet and moved up through the ranks, and it was wonderful. We need more of that! I’m hoping that we’ll get a lot more such asides in the remaining books in the series, since much more material must be created to expand the episodes into novel-length stories. This is another book that is probably of interest only to completionists.

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Star Trek Star Fleet Technical Manual by Franz Joseph

Posted by Tracy Poff on September 27, 2017

So far in our journey through treklit, we’ve seen a lot of adaptations, several nonfiction books, and even a novel or two. Now we come to a new kind of book: a reference book, presented as a non-fictional item from the fictional universe. Today’s subject is the Star Trek Star Fleet Technical Manual by Franz Joseph, published in November 1975. This book was preceded by the Star Trek Blueprints by the same author, published in April of the same year, which I do not presently have access to.

At the beginning is the Articles of Federation for the United Federation of Planets, twenty pages of dull pseudo-legalese devoted to which groups vote on which things and how. The most interesting thing here, probably, is the listing of the initial members of the Federation (in article 23):

The Federation Council shall consist of eleven (11) members of the United Federation. The United Nations of the Planet Earth, the Planetary Confederation of 40 Eridani, the United Planets of 61 Cygni, the Star Empire of Epsilon Indii, and the Alpha Centauri Concordium of Planets shall be permanent members of the Federation Council. The Supreme Assembly shall elect six (6) other members of the United Federation to be non-permanent members of the Federation Council, due regard being especially paid, in the first instance, to the contribution of the members of the United Federation to the maintenance of interplanetary peace and security and to the other purposes of the Federation, and also to equitable geo-galactical distribution;

40 Eridani is the Vulcan star system, 61 Cygni the Tellarite system, and Epsilon Indii the Andorian system.

The Articles of Federation are followed by the peace treaty with the Romulan Star Empire, then the peace treaty with the Klingons imposed by the Organians. After this are many pages of diagrams: the flags of the members of the Federation, patterns for uniforms, schematics for equipment, blueprints for buildings, everything you could wish for.

On the whole, this book is probably better as a sourcebook for Trek-related creative endeavors than as a standalone book.

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Spockanalia #2

Posted by Tracy Poff on September 13, 2017

As we continue catching up on fanzines, we come to Spockanalia #2, published in April 1968.

During the interval since the previous issue, the editors engaged in correspondence with several figures in the Trek world, and excerpts from their letters are reprinted. Featured are Gene Roddenberry, Dorothy Fontana, James Doohan, Walter Koenig, DeForest Kelley, and Leonard Nimoy.

Sherna Comerford writes “A Revisit”, which updates articles from the first issue in light of information from the newer episodes and communications.

“The Man in the Hero Suit” by E. A. Oddstad is a very interesting essay on Kirk’s character. An excerpt from the end:

Kirk’s morals are a set of words and actions imposed on him. They are not part of his character. The Kirk in the parallel universe had learned other words and actions. Though the mirror Spock has integrity and the mirror McCoy humanity, the mirror Kirk is (or was; he must be dead by now) a thorough going rat. The only redeeming quality in either Kirk is a deep-hidden humanity that occasionally, unexpectedly, surfaces. When it does, it’s like finding a diamond ring at a beach.

Fortunately, ‘our’ Kirk lives in a less repellent society and obeys its laws. And he has Spock for a logical conscience and McCoy as a humane conscience.

“Stars Over Vulcan” by V. A. H. Nietz tackles Vulcan astrology.

“The Dour Scots Engineer” by Ruth Berman examines the character of Scotty as an example of the archetype named in the title.

Poul Anderson contributes a poem in Kirk’s voice, “Star Date:6721; Condition:Confused”, a parody of “Trees” by Joyce Kilmer: “I think that I shall never grok / A man as logical as Spock.”

In “Terran-Vulcan Genetic Compatibility”, Susan Hereford writes:

The theory, held by some, that the Terran woman involved is a direct descendant of Mr. Sherlock Holmes and therefore carries many of his traits, is unprovable because of the number of bastards in the line. It would easily account for her attractiveness to a Vulcan. Proponents of this theory point out that there is a pronounced physical resemblence between Mr. Holmes and the hybrid.

Leonard Nimoy would go on to play Sherlock Holmes in a short film in 1975 and on stage in 1976, and the Holmes connection would get a nod in Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country (written by Nicholas Meyer, author of The Seven-Per-Cent Solution), when Spock says, “An ancestor of mine maintained that if you eliminate the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth.”

In “Message Tape”, Miriam Langsam writes as “Lieutenant Miriam Langsam”, offering advice on what life is like on a starship.

“The Allure of Uhura” by robert toomey is a somewhat aimless essay in praise of Uhura–especially of her beauty. She is competent, too, toomey allows, which she manages “without ever once losing any of her feminine appeal.” It’s a curious thing to see.

In “Communication from Star Fleet Intelligence”, John Mansfield offers up “the Klingon view of Vulcans, and of Vulcan-Terran relations, which is quite faulty.” The Klingon opinion is that Vulcans are deceitful and that Earth is “waiting for the day when it will be liberated from the Vulcan yoke” by the Klingons, whose job it is “to spread enlightenment throughout the stars.” A unique view of Klingons!

In “God and the Vulcan Mind”, Joyce Yasner author argues that Vulcans could be religious, for they “as a people of science and logic, could find a scientific explanation of God which says that He is energy” and that “Vulcans can also believe in reincarnation and immortality.” This issue would eventually be addressed by Star Trek: Enterprise, many years later.

In “A Speculation on Spock’s Family”, Sandra Miesel argues that Sarek might have been wed to a Vulcan woman before Amanda, and thus produced offspring other than Spock, though “leading Vulcan xenologist Dorothy Fontana” maintains otherwise. Star Trek V: The Final Frontier agreed with Miesel on this one.

“Personal Diary Entries” by Deborah Langsam descibes how Ensign Michaelson, a medical trainee who has been placed under Chekov’s command in order to get some interdepartmental experience, gets back at him for sexually harassing her and generally being a jerk.

“To Christine” by Lyn Veryzer is a poem warning Christine (Chapel, presumably) not to waste her time pursuing Spock, who cannot love her.

“On the Origin of Humanoid Life in Our Galaxy” by Jean Lorrah and Willard F. Hunt argues that the striking similarity of the species in the galaxy indicates that the galaxy must have been colonized, long ago, by some earlier humanoid species, which has been lost to memory. TNG’s “The Chase” supports this theory.

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The Trouble With Tribbles by David Gerrold

Posted by Tracy Poff on September 9, 2017

Time for another step back in the Trek schedule. Today, we’ll take a look at David Gerrold’s The Trouble With Tribbles, published on 12 April 1973.

This book goes into some detail about how Gerrold came to write the titular episode, and includes several drafts as well as the final script, each annotated with information about how and why some of the earlier concepts were changed for the final script. In addition to describing the writing process, Gerrold gives a bit of information about how the props were made and how shooting went, and finally reflects on the impact the episode has had, both on him and others. He concludes the book with an anecdote about sending a spare tribble to a hospital to encourage a girl, paralyzed by meningitis, in her recovery.

This isn’t the first time I’ve mentioned this book–I noted it last year, when I wrote about Gerrold’s The World of Star Trek (published simultaneously), but I’ve only recently acquired a copy. Was it worth the wait?

Not really. It’s well written, of course, and amusing enough to read, but by the time I got through the final draft of “The Trouble With Tribbles”, I was pretty well sick of the story. Whitfield’s The Making of Star Trek goes into more interesting detail about the production aspects, and Gerrold’s own The World of Star Trek is a more interesting look at the writing. The form of the book is basically autobiographical, but it’s rather scant of details. There’s a little talk at the beginning on how Gerrold has always been a fan of science fiction, and a few more anecdotes scattered throughout, but otherwise the focus is very much on the revision of the script.

My suggestion: unless you’re a particularly big fan of “The Trouble With Tribbles”, read The World of Star Trek, instead.

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Star Trek Log Five by Alan Dean Foster

Posted by Tracy Poff on September 5, 2017

In July 1975, five months after the publication of the previous volume, was published Star Trek Log Five by Alan Dean Foster. This volume, as usual, adapts three episodes from Star Trek: The Animated Series: “The Ambergris Element”, “The Pirates of Orion”, and “Jihad”.

The Ambergris Element

The blurb on the back of the book for this story reads: “Marooned on the strange water world of Argo, Kirk and Spock are in incredible danger . . . pursued by a hideous sea monster!” That is only accurate in the most approximate sense. There is a water world, and a sea monster, but Kirk and Spock aren’t marooned and the story isn’t about a sea monster chasing them. Rather, a sea monster attacks their submarine and they’re injured. The water-breathing natives find and heal them, mutating Kirk and Spock into water-breathers as part of the process. The story is about Kirk and Spock attempting to return to normal, hindered by the cultural traditions of the aliens, but aided by some of the younger aliens, who are willing to ignore the old traditions to do what’s right. The blurb does not do the story justice.

This is a good story, and Foster improves on the episode. An altogether satisfying adaptation.

The Pirates of Orion

Spock has contracted a deadly illness, and the only cure has been stolen by pirates. Kirk must catch them and retrieve the medicine before it is too late.

Like many of these stories, the tension is provided by what amounts to a timer counting down. In this case, Spock’s life is on the line, and to be fair it is interesting to see how affected Kirk is by the situation, but ultimately the plot isn’t interesting.

Jihad

Kirk and Spock, along with several others of various species, are tasked with retrieving a religious artifact stolen from the Skorr before they declare war on the rest of the galaxy. The group must work together in a hostile environment where all previous efforts have failed.

The plot of this story is unsatisfying. It feels like the group just wanders around, stumbling from danger to danger, until finally they discover the artifact, survive the climactic encounter, and the story ends. There’s no particular buildup; the story doesn’t go anywhere so much as it churns in place for fifty pages and then spits everyone out the other side.

In summary

“The Ambergris Element” is the only worthwhile story in this one. The writing is good, as usual (though my edition, at least, is positively riddled with typographical errors), but it isn’t enough to save the other two stories.

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Star Trek 11 by James Blish

Posted by Tracy Poff on August 20, 2017

Published in April 1975, Star Trek 11 was the last entry in that series completed before Blish’s death. Star Trek 11 contains adaptations of six episodes: “What Are Little Girls Made Of?”, “The Squire of Gothos”, “Wink of an Eye”, “Bread and Circuses”, “Day of the Dove”, and “Plato’s Stepchildren”.

What Are Little Girls Made Of?

The Enterprise investigates the planet where Dr. Roger Korby, who incidentally was Christine Chapel’s fiance, disappeared several years ago. They find him working on a technology that can make lifelike androids and even transfer a human’s consciousness into an android. He wishes to use this technology to build a better society, free from want or hate–but is it really better?

Michael Strong’s performance as Korby in this episode was quite good, but Blish eliminates some unfortunate things like Ruk’s “That was the equation!”. I’d say this is of comparable quality to the episode, overall. An enjoyable adaptation of a good story.

The Squire of Gothos

The Enterprise finds a planet on which resides a strange and powerful alien, Trelane, who is very taken with Earth–the Earth of nine hundred years prior, that is. Trelane, styling himself the Squire of Gothos, forces them to dance to his tune for his amusement, while Kirk searches for a way to escape his power.

Surprisingly, this is pretty good even without William Campbell’s excellent performance–perhaps because I’m reading all of Trelane’s lines in his voice.

Wink of an Eye

The Enterprise, responding to a distress call, finds an empty planet. It turns out to be populated by people who experience time at a fantastic rate, making their movements far too quick for the crew of the Enterprise to perceive. The same disaster that caused their immense acceleration also rendered their men all sterile, so their queen, Deela, has taken the Enterprise in order to have Kirk as a mate.

Not too bad, but not great. A substantial part of the appeal of the episode was in seeing the non-accelerated members of the crew frozen in time, but the adaptation doesn’t convey the same feeling.

Bread and Circuses

The Enterprise finds a planet that has developed remarkably similarly to Earth, except that it is ruled by a modern version of the Roman empire. This is cited as an example of Hodgkin’s Law of Parallel Planetary Development–utter nonsense, of course, and not even consistent with other episodes.

As with “Wink of an Eye”, above, and as I said of “A Piece of the Action” in my review of Star Trek 4, much of the good in this episode was in the seeing, so the adaptation isn’t as interesting.

Day of the Dove

The crew of the Enterprise and of a Klingon ship are brought together by an energy being that feeds on hatred. They eventually drive it off by laughing at it.

That summary sounds pretty bad, but it’s a fairly good story, really. Incidentally, this is the first appearance of Kang, who later figures into stories in DS9 and Voyager.

Plato’s Stepchildren

The Enterprise, responding to a distress call, finds a planet where the thirty-eight inhabitants have psychokinetic powers. Their leader Parmen, who is gifted with the strongest power, is ill, and McCoy must save him. Once restored, Parmen is unwilling to let McCoy go–and in any case secretly intends to destroy the Enterprise rather than allow them to leave with knowledge of the planet’s location.

This episode didn’t have much going for it other than watching the actors pretend to be moved by external forces–including the famous kiss between Uhura and Kirk. The theme is simple: power corrupts. The plot resolves conveniently and Kirk rides off into the sunset.

In summary

This volume has a few good stories, and a few middling ones. I don’t know if Blish’s writing is stronger in this one, or if absence has made my heart grow fonder (it has been about two years since my review of Star Trek 10, after all), but I think even the lesser stories were pretty enjoyable. If novelizations are your thing, Star Trek 11 is a good entry in the series.

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Spockanalia #1

Posted by Tracy Poff on August 16, 2017

Spockanalia #1, published in September 1967, is the first issue of Spockanalia, a fairly important Star Trek fanzine. You can get some more detail about the series as a whole (and fanzines in general) from my previous post on the subject, written in September of last year. Then, I wrote about the little bit of Spockanalia that I had access to, and noted that I’d revisit it if I could learn more. Good news: I’ve recently gained access to Spockanalia, thanks to the Sandy Hereld Collection at Texas A&M, so here is the promised update. In my previous post, I wrote about “The Territory of Rigel”, “Spock Shock”, “Vulcans and Emotions”, and “Kirk and Spock”. I’ll copy here what I wrote then, with any additions and updates, interleaved with the new material.

Since this is the inaugural issue, I will give a brief summary of every item published in this issue, with notes and quotations when something is of particular interest. I will probably not be quite as thorough in my posts on subsequent issues, unless there is demand for it.

Lettercol

The issue opens with a letter from Leonard Nimoy, wishing the editors luck: “I sincerely hope that your magazine will be a success, and want to thank you very much for your interest in STAR TREK and MR. SPOCK.”.

The Territory of Rigel

Following the lettercol is printed “The Territory of Rigel”, a song written by Dorothy Jones. She introduces it as “a piece supposed to have been written by Spock, many years ago.” She describes it as a “Vulcan form called ni var” which “means literally ‘two form’ . . . a piece comparing and contrasting two different things or two aspects of the same thing.” This term would get a nod 35 years later in the Star Trek: Enterprise episode “Shadows of P’Jem”, as the name of a Vulcan starship. “The Territory of Rigel” is reprinted in Verba’s Boldly Writing. It’s an interesting exercise, but not to my taste as poetry.

Off the Top

A news and editorial section. First, it speculates on the upcoming episode, “Amok Time”, the second season opener:

In the course of the program, Spock will meet his assigned wife, for the purpose of satisfying the Vulcan septennial mating drive.
Vulcans – or at least Vulcan males (at the moment, we’re not quite sure which) must experience sex every seven years, or die.

We have been told that the story is handled with the same care and skill that made Star Trek our favorite program in its
first season. Look out, September 15th – here we come!

After this, it is reported that certain broadcasters have been cutting material from the episodes in order to make more room for commercials, including a section of about thirty seconds from “Dagger of the Mind”. Readers are encouraged to write to WNBC-TV to protest.

After some trivia about Spock and McCoy, Leonard Nimoy’s album “Leonard Nimoy presents Mr. Spock’s Music from Outer Space” is announced, plus the upcoming single “The Ballad of Bilbo Baggins/Cotton Candy”, and a movie is mention in which Nimoy starred (and which he co-produced), Deathwatch.

Readers are then exhorted to continue the letter-writing campaign to ensure Trek‘s renewal.

Last, it is hinted that there may be a Spockanalia #2 in the future.

A Most Illogical Song

A song by Shirley Meech, Kathy Bushman, and Sherna Comerford about wishing to be near to Spock. It begins: “I wish I was on board the Enterprise.”

Physiologica Vulcanensis

An article by Sherna Comerford, Juanita Coulson, and Kay Anderson concerning Vulcan physiology–skin pigment, the circulatory system, pon farr, and more. Amusingly, “The interesting theory has arisen that the sentinant species of Vulcan has an ancestry which is far more feline that simian.” It is also opined that Spock is likely to be sterile.

The length–about half a page–devoted to pon farr, given that “Amok Time” was yet to air (and, indeed, the term pon farr was not yet known) prefigures the substantial and sustained interest that this particular aspect of Vulcan physiology would have in the fandom.

A Proprosed Model of the Vulcan Heart

An article by Sandy Deckinger (with a diagram!) speculating on what the Vulcan heart might look like. Two articles in one issue touching on that subject–I wonder if it had been brought up in a letter in another zine, or if there were some other motivating element.

To a Vulcan

A poem by Sherna Comerford on Spock’s emotions, or lack thereof. The ending is poignant: “Is life worth this price? / A man-machine would pay no price. / Would die. What logic bids you live?”

Also to a Vulcan

A poem by Devra Michele Langsam on loving a Vulcan.

The Vulcan Gambit

An article by Shirley Meech offering an explanation to why Spock would lose to Kirk at 3-D chess: he loses on purpose, so the victory will put Kirk :into a frame of mind which is beneficial to his self-image, his efficiency rating, and the well-being of the crew in general.” Logical!

Vulcan Psychology

An article by Juanita Coulson, framed as a report by a psychologist analyzing Spock. Coulson speculates that Spock pushes himself so hard because he was never able to please his father, and that he may see Kirk as a kind of substitute father figure.

Spock Shock

A brief skit by Sherna Comerford, which was later performed at the 1969 Star Trek Con. An absurd bit of interaction between Captain Curt, Mr. Swock, and others on the bridge of the USS Undersize.

Vulcans and Emotions

An essay by Devra Michele Langsam in academic style (with citations in end notes!) considering whether Vulcans experience emotions. It concludes: “It is the firm conviction of the author that Vulcan emotions do exist, however unlike human emotions they may be, and that these cannot be ignored in dealing with that planet’s sentient species.” The essay’s conclusion turned out to be correct, in fact: later Trek indicates that Vulcans do not lack emotions, merely control them. This is the earliest example of serious investigation into the ‘facts’ of the Star Trek universe I’ve seen; many more would follow.

Kirk and Spock

A short poem by Ruth Berman (reprinted from Pantopon #17) about the titular characters, so different, who “even when they disagree / (And they generally do) / Seek out each other’s company.”

Thoughts on Vulcan Culture

An article by Devra Michele Langsam speculating on Vulcan culture. Langsam argues that Vulcan children must be raised in small family units and that they probably have no family names, and wonders how Vulcan children might be trained. She speculates on whether Vulcans, who are immune to the effects of alcohol, might have some other sort of drugs which do have an effect. Amusingly, she echoes some speculation mentioned in “Physiologica Vulcanensis”: “Those who support the theory of feline Vulcan ancestry have suggested that catnip might have an invigorating, not to say intoxicating, effect upon them.”

A recurring theme in fan fiction comes up when Langsam writes about mind melds:

And yet, one wonders. Perhaps, despite its unpleasant aspects, the mind-touch technique offers Vulcans
a possibility of emotional contact within accepted social patterns. Assuming that Vulcans do not repress
their pleasure in the physical, is it possible that in the moment of intercourse, at the height of physical intimacy,
Vulcans permit their precious barriers to slip, in order to enjoy the doubled pleasure of mind and body, of each
other’s delight?

Excerpt from The Young Vulcan’s Handbook of Emotional Control

An article by Shirley Meech. In a nod to Tolkien, Meech claims merely to be the translator: “The following is an excerpt from a Vulcan book-tape, obtained via the Baggins method from the possessions of Commander Spock, on his recent visit to Earth.” I believe that ‘the Baggins method’ is the best euphemism for theft that I’ve ever heard.

Printed following this article is a paragraph from Sandy Deckinger once more connecting Vulcans with cats. In part: “Mr. Spock’s ears meet the requirements set by the Cat Fanciers Society of America for the Abyssinian breed of feline.”

Record Review

A detailed review by Dorothy Jones of “Leonard Nimoy Presents Mr. Spock’s Music from Outer Space”. Jones is not terribly impressed with the instrumental tracks, but finds the vocal tracks enjoyable, and is complimentary of Nimoy’s voice–though admitting he does need vocal training.

Star Drek

A story by Ruth Berman, reprinted from Pantopon #16, which places Kirk, Spock, Uhura, and McCoy in the world of Spenser’s The Faerie Queene. It would be republished, the Trek references excised, as “Ptolemaic Hijack” in Worlds of Fantasy #4 in 1971. To be perfectly frank, I think that ‘drek’ gets it about right.

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Star Trek Log Four by Alan Dean Foster

Posted by Tracy Poff on August 13, 2017

Another day, another book of adapted cartoons. In February 1975 was published Alan Dean Foster’s fourth book of Star Trek: The Animated Series novelizations, imaginatively titled Star Trek Log Four. This volume contains adaptations of “The Terratin Incident”, “Time Trap”, and “More Tribbles, More Troubles”.

If there’s one unifying theme to these stories, it’s that they have very little plot to speak of. Just oops, here’s a bit of trouble for five dozen pages, and then they turn the crank or whatever and the trouble is resolved. For a bit more detail…

The Terratin Incident

The Enterprise receives a strange transmission in a long-obsolete code, the only intelligible word of which being ‘Terratin’. When they go to investigate, they are hit by a strange light, which destroys their dilithium crystals and–it turns out–causes the crew and all organic material on board to begin to shrink. They must find some way to fix things before they become too small to operate the ship.

This story is filled with interesting asides, satisfying bits of trivia about the characters, and an utter lack of developing plot. Just page after page of “and they got a bit smaller, so they had to rig up an extra-long pole to reach the coffee pot”, until finally they get to the end of the story and things are explained, and they solve the problem by sending everyone through the transporter to return them to their natural size.

Time Trap

Exploring a weird section of space, the “Delta Triangle”, a futuristic analog of the Bermuda Triangle, the Enterprise is attacked by a Klingon ship which promptly vanishes. Then they escape from that ship’s compatriots by following it through a pothole in space to a pocket dimension called Elysia where, for some reason, people don’t age and dilithium quickly degrades to uselessness (unreliable stuff, apparently).

This is another story in which there is precious little plot. The Enterprise gets stuck, so they glue it to the Klingon ship for an extra boost, and the problem is solved. The people living in Elysia exist pretty much solely for the sake of communicating to Kirk a last minute warning about a Klingon plot.

More Tribbles, More Troubles

The Enterprise, escorting ships carrying grain, encounters a Klingon ship chasing a small Federation vessel. They beam the pilot aboard just as his ship is destroyed, and what do you know, it’s Cyrano Jones, out selling tribbles again. This time, instead of reproducing rapidly, they just grow to immense proportions. Oh, but actually they still breed explosively, too. So… yeah. Tribbles, again. They beam them over to the Klingon ship, again.

In Summary

This is just not a good selection of stories. If it’d been just one or even two of them that were very light on plot, it’d be bearable, but for all three to be so mindless? It’s pretty bad. The writing is as good as usual, though, and Arex gets a fair bit of ‘screen time’ throughout, which is nice. The show could really have done with some more focus on the non-human (and non-vulcan) crew, so it’s good to see the novelizations correcting that. Even so, I wouldn’t recommend reading this one unless you’re a completionist.

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Star Trek Log Three by Alan Dean Foster

Posted by Tracy Poff on May 18, 2017

Continuing, after quite some delay, my series of reviews of Treklit, we come to Alan Dean Foster’s Star Trek Log Three, another in his series of novelizations of Star Trek: The Animated Series. This volume contains adaptations of “Once Upon a Planet”, “Mudd’s Passion”, and “The Magicks of Megas-Tu”.

Once Upon a Planet

This story is a sequel to the TOS episode “Shore Leave”, in which the Enterprise happens upon a ‘shore leave planet’ that is designed just to satisfy, as Kirk noted, the need of complex minds for the simplicity of play.

The Enterprise has been overtaxed, lately (the stories in these novelizations are written as taking place in sequence), so Kirk asks for something special in the way of reward for the crew, and he gets it: approval for shore leave on the Shore Leave Planet, in the Omicron region.

Upon arriving, Uhura, Sulu, and McCoy beam down together and note that everything seems to be as it was when last they saw the planet, down to the appearance of Alice and the White Rabbit. They go their separate ways in order to enjoy their own–private–fantasies, but McCoy has scarcely come into view of the Southern mansion he dreamed up when he is set upon by armed playing cards, straight out of Alice, who attack him in deadly earnest. He manages to call for an emergency beam-up just in time to escape them.

Shore leave is canceled as the crew of the Enterprise strive to determine why the planet is attacking, why the Keeper didn’t intervene, and what has happened to Uhura, who has vanished without a trace.

This story is pretty good, and translated well by Foster.

Mudd’s Passion

Cutting shore leave somewhat short, the Enterprise is ordered to investigate the activity of an old ‘friend’, Harry Mudd, who we last saw in “I, Mudd”. He is up to his old tricks, swindling people far and wide. This time, he’s selling a love potion.

This story is very thin and no better for Foster’s efforts.

The Magicks of Megas-Tu

The Enterprise is sent to investigate the unusual phenomena at the center of the galaxy, including a ‘negative black hole’ busily ejecting matter, which they presume to be the source of all matter in the galaxy, drawing its energy from a multitude of other universes. Then they begin to be drawn into a cone-shaped vortex which is drawing in–and destroying–matter, from which the Enterprise cannot escape. They gamble that it may be safer in the center of the vortex, and, passing through it, they find themselves in another place, strange to them, operating by no known laws.

The delicate equipment of the Enterprise does not take kindly to this lawlessness, and begins to fail. The crew, dependent on this equipment, begin to fail as well. When the situation has grown most desperate, the Enterprise is suddenly saved by a strange alien–half man, half goat–who appears on the bridge. He restores their environment with what appears to be magic, then introduces himself:

“Who am I? Oh, you want a name! Call me Baal.” He paused thoughtfully. “Or Lucien. Yes, Lucien. But above all, call me friend.” One finger fluttered skyward as he declaimed, “Never could I abandon those who have come so far to frolic with me . . . for such purpose you must have been sent.”

Lucien introduces the to the planet Megas-Tu, where the physical laws correspond to what the humans would call magic. His people had ventured out of their own universe before and encountered Earth, but their welcome had not been so warm. When others of Lucien’s people discover the humans, they quickly put them on trial for the crimes of their species, as exemplified by the Salem witch trials, in which, weakened by the distance from their own world, the Megans were persecuted and even burned.

Kirk argues that if humans were once so savage, they have changed, and continue to strive to change, to be better and more noble. The Megans accept that this may be so, but declare that Lucien still must be punished for bringing the humans to Megas-Tu. Kirk defends him, as well, accusing the Megans of being as cruel as they accused the humans of being. In so doing, he passes a secret test, proving by his concern for Lucien, known also as Lucifer, that humans truly have changed. Should humans again visit Megas-Tu, they would find a warmer welcome.

Where to begin with this one? The adaptation is good–superior to the original. It spends too long on the setup and not enough on the resolution, but it’s still well done. As for the story, it was obvious to anyone just who a goat man named Lucien would turn out to be, but it was satisfying, all the same. Kirk and McCoy question whether Lucien was really the Lucifer of myth, and McCoy concedes that it doesn’t really matter, except:

“It’s just that–if he was, Jim–this would be the second time he was on the verge of being cast out. But thanks to you, this is the first time he was saved.”

The author of this episode, Larry Brody, indicated that originally, the Enterprise was to meet God out in space, but that idea was nixed by the censors. But meeting the Devil in space was fine, and so the episode was born. This episode must have been influential, indeed. In the first episode of Star Trek: The Next Generation, “Encounter at Farpoint”, Q puts the crew of the Enterprise on trial for the crimes of humanity, and Picard, too, argues that Q should consider whether humanity is presently as savage as in times past. Then in “Where No One Has Gone Before”, the Enterprise is taken to the edge of the universe, and find it a strange place where reality is impacted by thought. Then, in Star Trek V: The Final Frontier, the Enterprise (under Kirk’s command, this time) visits the center of the galaxy, where they find a godlike being who turns out to be evil.

In summary

The first and last stories in this are quite good, though the middle one is forgettable. That’s a pretty good ratio for novelizations of television episodes. “Once Upon a Planet” is perfectly like any Trek episode you’ve ever seen, and “Mudd’s Passion” is like most of the bad ones. “The Magicks of Megas-Tu” isn’t a top-tier story, but it’s pleasant enough, and interesting in how it presages later Trek. If you’re a Trek fan looking for a little light reading, this book isn’t bad.

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Spockanalia

Posted by Tracy Poff on September 15, 2016

Though we’re up to August 1974 in my chronological investigation of Star Trek, we must once again step back in time to look at an interesting bit of history: Spockanalia, the first Star Trek fanzine, edited by Devra Michele Langsam and Sherna Comerford.

A few words on fanzines, for the uninitiated: before the internet and easy global communication, fans could be pretty isolated from one another, but the urge to form a community with other fans was no less strong, so what could be done? Telephone calls, letters, and meetups and conventions could go only so far to quench the fannish thirst, so the most enterprising of fans went a step further, collecting stories, essays, letters, poems, songs, art, and other forms of fan labor, arranging them into magazines, and duplicating and distributing them, either by mail (for a fee or an in-kind trade of another fanzine) or at meetups and cons.

Fanzines are discussed in David Gerrold’s The World of Star Trek (1973), of which I’ve written previously, and in much more detail in Joan Marie Verba’s Boldly Writing (1996).

Five issues of Spockanalia were published, between September 1967 and June 1970. Its influence was substantial: in a letter to the editors (printed in Spockanalia 3), Gene Roddenberry wrote:

SPOCKANALIA is “required reading” for everyone in our offices, and I am most distressed that you were not told of this before. We have used all the extra copies to make sure that every new writer, and anyone who makes decisions on show policy have read your fanzine, and Juanita Coulson’s ST-PHILE. The reason for this is that if we all understand what the fans see in the show, and try to understand why they are fans at all, we can then continue to hold those fans. Certain fanzines, and yours is one of them, have a mature and well-written format that is very instructive to our staff.

Besides letters from the cast and crew of Star Trek, Spockanalia published a number of items whose authors might be recognizable: Juanita Coulson, Jacqueline Lichtenberg, Dorothy Jones, Poul Anderson, and Lois McMaster Bujold among them. Two stories published in Spockanalia 4 were later republished in Star Trek: The New Voyages and Star Trek: The New Voyages 2, anthologies edited by Sondra Marshak and Myrna Culbreath, published by Bantam. You can find tables of contents for each issue, a few scanned pages, and a wealth of other information at Fanlore.

I’d love to give a fully detailed review of these fanzines, but they had limited circulation and are collectibles, so copies (possibly illegitimate!) of the issues generally go for somewhere between ‘a bit expensive’ and ‘absurdly expensive’. I’ll write a few words about those items that are available to me, though, and I’ll revisit them, should I learn more.

There are many (so many!) other fanzines that are worthy of attention, but they suffer from the same lack of availability as Spockanalia. If I tried to track down every issue for this blog, I’d never get through the pro fic, and I’d run out of money besides. Still, I’ll try to mention fan works I’m aware of, when they’re relevant.

Without further ado…

Spockanalia 1

spockanalia-1

The first issue opens with a letter from Leonard Nimoy, wishing the editors luck: “I sincerely hope that your magazine will be a success, and want to thank you very much for your interest in STAR TREK and MR. SPOCK.”.

Following that is printed “The Territory of Rigel”, a song written by Dorothy Jones. She introduces it as “a piece supposed to have been written by Spock, many years ago.” She describes it as a “Vulcan form called ni var” which “means literally ‘two form’ . . . a piece comparing and contrasting two different things or two aspects of the same thing.” This term would get a nod 35 years later in the Star Trek: Enterprise episode “Shadows of P’Jem”, as the name of a Vulcan starship. “The Territory of Rigel” is reprinted in Verba’s Boldly Writing. It’s an interesting exercise, but not to my taste as poetry.

“Spock Shock” by Sherna Comerford is a brief skit, which was later performed at the 1969 Star Trek Con. An absurd bit of interaction between Captain Curt, Mr. Swock, and others on the bridge of the USS Undersize.

“Vulcans and Emotions” by Devra Michele Langsam is an essay in academic style (with citations in end notes!) considering whether Vulcans experience emotions. It concludes: “It is the firm conviction of the author that Vulcan emotions do exist, however unlike human emotions they may be, and that these cannot be ignored in dealing with that planet’s sentient species.” The essay’s conclusion turned out to be correct, in fact: later Trek indicates that Vulcans do not lack emotions, merely control them. This is the earliest example of serious investigation into the ‘facts’ of the Star Trek universe I’ve seen; many more would follow.

“Kirk and Spock” by Ruth Berman is a short poem (reprinted from Pantopon #17) about the titular characters, so different, who “even when they disagree / (And they generally do) / Seek out each other’s company.”

Spockanalia 2

spockanalia-2

“The Man in the Hero Suit” by E. A. Oddstad is a very interesting essay on Kirk’s character. An excerpt from the end:

Kirk’s morals are a set of words and actions imposed on him. They are not part of his character. The Kirk in the parallel universe had learned other words and actions. Though the mirror Spock has integrity and the mirror McCoy humanity, the mirror Kirk is (or was; he must be dead by now) a thorough going rat. The only redeeming quality in either Kirk is a deep-hidden humanity that occasionally, unexpectedly, surfaces. When it does, it’s like finding a diamond ring at a beach.

Fortunately, ‘our’ Kirk lives in a less repellent society and obeys its laws. And he has Spock for a logical conscience and McCoy as a humane conscience.

“The Allure of Uhura” by robert toomey (lowercase as published) is an essay–a paean–on Uhura. Uninteresting.

Spockanalia 3

spockanalia-3

“Visit to a Weird Planet” by Jean Lorrah and Willard F. Hunt is a story (a ‘real person fic’) in which Kirk, Spock, and McCoy are somehow accidentally beamed to the (then-) present-day set of Star Trek, filming in progress, and must pretend to be their counterparts (Shatner, Nimoy, and Kelley) until they can be rescued. Great literature it’s not (and the more general premise of Trek characters traveling to present-day Earth had been done six months earlier in the TOS episode “Assignment: Earth” and a year before that in “Tomorrow is Yesterday”, and travel to 1930 in “The City on the Edge of Forever”), but it’s a serviceable bit of comedy. This story would have a number of sequels by different authors.

Spockanalia 4

spockanalia-4

“Time Enough” by Lelamarie S. Kreidler explores a brief relationship between Spock and a half-Vulcan member of the Enterprise‘s crew, Lt. Cmdr. Lian Jameson, otherwise known as T’Lian, during Spock’s pon farr. The device of pon farr would become quite popular in fanfic, continuing to the present day. This writing is clumsy in places, but perhaps not more so than some actual Star Trek scripts. Little story to speak of, but not a bad interlude.

Spockanalia 5

spockanalia-5

“Cave-In” by Jane Peyton, later published in Star Trek: The New Voyages 2.

“Visit to a Weird Planet Revisited” by Ruth Berman, a sequel to “Visit to a Weird Planet” from Spockanalia 3, later published in Star Trek: The New Voyages.

Since both of these are included in books I’ll be reading later for this project, I’ll leave description of them for that time.

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