Other Stuff Exists

Don't get too comfortable with the familiar–other stuff exists, so go explore!

Spockanalia

Posted by Tracy Poff on September 15, 2016

Though we’re up to August 1974 in my chronological investigation of Star Trek, we must once again step back in time to look at an interesting bit of history: Spockanalia, the first Star Trek fanzine, edited by Devra Michele Langsam and Sherna Comerford.

A few words on fanzines, for the uninitiated: before the internet and easy global communication, fans could be pretty isolated from one another, but the urge to form a community with other fans was no less strong, so what could be done? Telephone calls, letters, and meetups and conventions could go only so far to quench the fannish thirst, so the most enterprising of fans went a step further, collecting stories, essays, letters, poems, songs, art, and other forms of fan labor, arranging them into magazines, and duplicating and distributing them, either by mail (for a fee or an in-kind trade of another fanzine) or at meetups and cons.

Fanzines are discussed in David Gerrold’s The World of Star Trek (1973), of which I’ve written previously, and in much more detail in Joan Marie Verba’s Boldly Writing (1996).

Five issues of Spockanalia were published, between September 1967 and June 1970. Its influence was substantial: in a letter to the editors (printed in Spockanalia 3), Gene Roddenberry wrote:

SPOCKANALIA is “required reading” for everyone in our offices, and I am most distressed that you were not told of this before. We have used all the extra copies to make sure that every new writer, and anyone who makes decisions on show policy have read your fanzine, and Juanita Coulson’s ST-PHILE. The reason for this is that if we all understand what the fans see in the show, and try to understand why they are fans at all, we can then continue to hold those fans. Certain fanzines, and yours is one of them, have a mature and well-written format that is very instructive to our staff.

Besides letters from the cast and crew of Star Trek, Spockanalia published a number of items whose authors might be recognizable: Juanita Coulson, Jacqueline Lichtenberg, Dorothy Jones, Poul Anderson, and Lois McMaster Bujold among them. Two stories published in Spockanalia 4 were later republished in Star Trek: The New Voyages and Star Trek: The New Voyages 2, anthologies edited by Sondra Marshak and Myrna Culbreath, published by Bantam. You can find tables of contents for each issue, a few scanned pages, and a wealth of other information at Fanlore.

I’d love to give a fully detailed review of these fanzines, but they had limited circulation and are collectibles, so copies (possibly illegitimate!) of the issues generally go for somewhere between ‘a bit expensive’ and ‘absurdly expensive’. I’ll write a few words about those items that are available to me, though, and I’ll revisit them, should I learn more.

There are many (so many!) other fanzines that are worthy of attention, but they suffer from the same lack of availability as Spockanalia. If I tried to track down every issue for this blog, I’d never get through the pro fic, and I’d run out of money besides. Still, I’ll try to mention fan works I’m aware of, when they’re relevant.

Without further ado…

Spockanalia 1

spockanalia-1

The first issue opens with a letter from Leonard Nimoy, wishing the editors luck: “I sincerely hope that your magazine will be a success, and want to thank you very much for your interest in STAR TREK and MR. SPOCK.”.

Following that is printed “The Territory of Rigel”, a song written by Dorothy Jones. She introduces it as “a piece supposed to have been written by Spock, many years ago.” She describes it as a “Vulcan form called ni var” which “means literally ‘two form’ . . . a piece comparing and contrasting two different things or two aspects of the same thing.” This term would get a nod 35 years later in the Star Trek: Enterprise episode “Shadows of P’Jem”, as the name of a Vulcan starship. “The Territory of Rigel” is reprinted in Verba’s Boldly Writing. It’s an interesting exercise, but not to my taste as poetry.

“Spock Shock” by Sherna Comerford is a brief skit, which was later performed at the 1969 Star Trek Con. An absurd bit of interaction between Captain Curt, Mr. Swock, and others on the bridge of the USS Undersize.

“Vulcans and Emotions” by Devra Michele Langsam is an essay in academic style (with citations in end notes!) considering whether Vulcans experience emotions. It concludes: “It is the firm conviction of the author that Vulcan emotions do exist, however unlike human emotions they may be, and that these cannot be ignored in dealing with that planet’s sentient species.” The essay’s conclusion turned out to be correct, in fact: later Trek indicates that Vulcans do not lack emotions, merely control them. This is the earliest example of serious investigation into the ‘facts’ of the Star Trek universe I’ve seen; many more would follow.

“Kirk and Spock” by Ruth Berman is a short poem (reprinted from Pantopon #17) about the titular characters, so different, who “even when they disagree / (And they generally do) / Seek out each other’s company.”

Spockanalia 2

spockanalia-2

“The Man in the Hero Suit” by E. A. Oddstad is a very interesting essay on Kirk’s character. An excerpt from the end:

Kirk’s morals are a set of words and actions imposed on him. They are not part of his character. The Kirk in the parallel universe had learned other words and actions. Though the mirror Spock has integrity and the mirror McCoy humanity, the mirror Kirk is (or was; he must be dead by now) a thorough going rat. The only redeeming quality in either Kirk is a deep-hidden humanity that occasionally, unexpectedly, surfaces. When it does, it’s like finding a diamond ring at a beach.

Fortunately, ‘our’ Kirk lives in a less repellent society and obeys its laws. And he has Spock for a logical conscience and McCoy as a humane conscience.

“The Allure of Uhura” by robert toomey (lowercase as published) is an essay–a paean–on Uhura. Uninteresting.

Spockanalia 3

spockanalia-3

“Visit to a Weird Planet” by Jean Lorrah and Willard F. Hunt is a story (a ‘real person fic’) in which Kirk, Spock, and McCoy are somehow accidentally beamed to the (then-) present-day set of Star Trek, filming in progress, and must pretend to be their counterparts (Shatner, Nimoy, and Kelley) until they can be rescued. Great literature it’s not (and the more general premise of Trek characters traveling to present-day Earth had been done six months earlier in the TOS episode “Assignment: Earth” and a year before that in “Tomorrow is Yesterday”, and travel to 1930 in “The City on the Edge of Forever”), but it’s a serviceable bit of comedy. This story would have a number of sequels by different authors.

Spockanalia 4

spockanalia-4

“Time Enough” by Lelamarie S. Kreidler explores a brief relationship between Spock and a half-Vulcan member of the Enterprise‘s crew, Lt. Cmdr. Lian Jameson, otherwise known as T’Lian, during Spock’s pon farr. The device of pon farr would become quite popular in fanfic, continuing to the present day. This writing is clumsy in places, but perhaps not more so than some actual Star Trek scripts. Little story to speak of, but not a bad interlude.

Spockanalia 5

spockanalia-5

“Cave-In” by Jane Peyton, later published in Star Trek: The New Voyages 2.

“Visit to a Weird Planet Revisited” by Ruth Berman, a sequel to “Visit to a Weird Planet” from Spockanalia 3, later published in Star Trek: The New Voyages.

Since both of these are included in books I’ll be reading later for this project, I’ll leave description of them for that time.

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